Title

A title is one or more words used before or after a person's name, in certain contexts. It may signify either generation, an official position, or a professional or academic qualification. In some languages, titles may be inserted between the first and last name (for example, Graf in German, Cardinal in Catholic usage (Richard Cardinal Cushing) or clerical titles such as Archbishop). Some titles are hereditary.

Aunt, Auntie, or Uncle may be used as titles by nieces and nephews, or by children to adults whom they know.

Other titles are used for various reasons, such as to show aristocratic status or one's role in government, in a religious organization, or in a branch of the military.

Some job titles of members of the legislature and executive are used as titles.

In the United Kingdom, "Lord" and "Lady" are used as titles for members of the nobility. Unlike titles such as "Mr" and "Mrs", they are not used before first names except in certain circumstances, for example as courtesy titles for younger sons, etc., of peers. In Scotland "Lord of Parliament" and "Lady of Parliament" are the equivalents of Baron and Baroness in England.

"Sir" and "Dame" differ from titles such as "Mr" and "Mrs" in that they can only be used before a person's first name, and not immediately before their surname.

Titles are used to show somebody's ordination as a priest or their membership in a religious order. Use of titles differs between denominations.

Christian priests often have their names prefixed with a title similar to The Reverend.

The names of shipboard officers, certain shipping line employees and Maritime Academy faculty/staff are preceded by their title when acting in performance of their duties.

The names of police officers may be preceded by a title such as "Officer" or by their rank.

In North America, several jurisdictions restrict the use of some professional titles to those individuals holding a valid and recognised license to practice. Individuals not authorised to use these reserved titles may be fined or jailed. Protected titles are often reserved to those professions that require a bachelor's degree[2] or higher and a state, provincial, or national license.

Some titles are used to show one's role or position in a society or organization.

Some titles are used in English to refer to the position of people in foreign political systems

Titles used in Rajasthan and other neighbourhood states of India in honour of Rajputs(only):

The following are no longer officially in use, though some may be claimed by former regnal dynasties.

When a difference exists below, male titles are placed to the left and female titles are placed to the right of the slash.

Members of legislatures often have post-nominal letters expressing this: