Buddhism

Ancient kingdoms and cities of India during the time of the Buddha (circa 500 BCE) – modern-day India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan
Enlightenment of Buddha, Kushan dynasty, late 2nd to early 3rd century CE, Gandhara

While all varieties of Buddhism revere "Buddha" and "buddhahood", they have different views on what these are. Whatever that may be, "Buddha" is still central to all forms of Buddhism.

The Dharma is the second of the three jewels which all Buddhists take refuge in. All Buddhas in all worlds, in the past, present and in the future, are believed by Buddhists to understand and teach the Dharma. Indeed, it is part of what makes them a Buddha that they do so.

Mahāyāna Buddhism also differs from Theravada and the other schools of early Buddhism in promoting several unique doctrines which are contained in Mahāyāna sutras and philosophical treatises.

These Indian Buddhist ideas, in various synthetic ways, form the basis of subsequent Mahāyāna philosophy in Tibetan Buddhism and East Asian Buddhism.

An ordination ceremony at Wat Yannawa in Bangkok. The Vinaya codes regulate the various sangha acts, including ordination.

In different Buddhist traditions, other related practices which focus on fasting are followed.

An 18th century Mongolian miniature which depicts the generation of the Vairocana Mandala
Vegetarian meal at Buddhist temple. East Asian Buddhism tends to promote vegetarianism.
Gandhara birchbark scroll fragments (c. 1st century) from British Library Collection
Buddhist monk Geshe Konchog Wangdu reads Mahayana sutras from an old woodblock copy of the Tibetan Kanjur.
Monastics and white clad laypersons celebrate Vesak, Vipassakna Dhaurak, Cambodia.
Chinese Buddhist monks performing a formal ceremony in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China