Who’s paying for Britain’s disastrous mini-budget? We are, with our health

Who’s paying for Britain’s disastrous mini-budget? We are, with our health

From stress about homelessness to illnesses caused by food poverty and cold homes, this financial chaos will take a heavy toll

This tsunami of interrelated health issues adds to the burden on the health system: a sick society results in sick people, and those sick people show up in hospitals needing care. The NHS is already at breaking point and unable to provide the quality and volume of care needed. This will only become worse in the current economic climate.

We have already seen the consequence that the financial crisis had on people’s health in Greece. In the years after 2007, there was a significant increase in the prevalence of people in Greece reporting that their health was bad or very bad. In addition, there was a significant increase in people not seeking medical care despite feeling it was necessary. This was largely a result of long waiting times, understaffing in hospitals, and major cuts to public hospital budgets. In addition, a national suicide helpline found that 25% of callers reported financial difficulties, with suicide rising during the period of financial crisis.

The government’s mini-budget is disastrous for the health of the British public. Why would they go down this route? We can debate whether Prime Minister Liz Truss is incompetent for not anticipating the market’s reaction, cruel in not caring what this does to the wellbeing of the population, or corrupt in helping the super-rich profit from the pound’s plummet. But in the end, we’re all poorer in Britain today compared with a decade ago. The effects will be felt not just in our bank balances, but also in our most important asset: our mind and bodies.