Liftoff! SpaceX Falcon 9 Soars Into the Sky With Space Station Supplies

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Liftoff! SpaceX Falcon 9 Soars Into the Sky With Space Station Supplies

NASA’s SpaceX 26th commercial resupply services mission lifts off from Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 2:20 p.m. EST on November 26, 2022. Credit: NASA/Chris Swanson

Several thousand pounds of important research, crew supplies, and hardware are on their way to the crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) following the 2:20 p.m. EST launch of NASA’s SpaceX 26th commercial resupply services mission from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Saturday, November 26, 2022.

SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft reached its preliminary orbit and its solar arrays have been deployed. A series of thruster firings are scheduled to allow Dragon to rendezvous with the space station on Sunday, November 27, at 7:30 a.m. EST. Live coverage of the docking will begin at 6 a.m. EST at https://www.nasa.gov/live.

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the Dragon cargo spacecraft lifts off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 26, 2022, on the company’s 26th commercial resupply services mission for the agency to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

NASA astronauts Josh Cassada and Nicole Mann will capture the Dragon using the space station’s robotic arm and then install it on the station’s Harmony module. Dragon will spend about one month attached to the space station.

During SpaceX’s 26th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station for NASA, the Dragon spacecraft will deliver more than 7,700 pounds of supplies, equipment, and several science investigations to the crew aboard the station, including the next pair of International Space Station Roll Out Solar Arrays (iROSAs), which will increase the power on the space station.

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the Dragon cargo spacecraft lifts off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 26, 2022, on the company’s 26th commercial resupply services mission for the agency to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the Dragon cargo spacecraft lifts off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 26, 2022, on the company’s 26th commercial resupply services mission for the agency to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket soars upward after its liftoff from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 26, 2022, on the company’s 26th Commercial Resupply Services mission for the agency to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket soars upward after its liftoff from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 26, 2022, on the company’s 26th Commercial Resupply Services mission for the agency to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

The final CubeSat is called Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology’s Research and Education Vehicle for Evaluating Radio Broadcasts (TJREVERB), developed by high school students, which will test the strength and consistency of iridium radio signals, the main way we communicate with CubeSats.

SpaceX’s 26th commercial resupply mission (CRS) launched to the International Space Station from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 26. The Dragon spacecraft carries scientific experiments and technology demonstrations that explore growing plants in space, creating nutrients on-demand, in-space construction, and more. Credit: NASA