FILIPINOS are satisfied with President Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr.'s programs on education, disaster response and health care, and dissatisfied with those on job creation, poverty reduction and managing inflation during his first 100 days in office, according to a survey commissioned by OCTA Research.

In its Tugon ng Masa survey from Oct. 23 to Oct. 27, 2022, 75 percent of respondents said that they were satisfied with the administration's program providing primary and secondary education, as well as its response to natural disasters and calamities.

Meanwhile, 74 percent of the respondents also said that they were satisfied with the administration's programs in providing quality tertiary, technical and vocational education, while 73 percent said they were satisfied with the quality and affordable health care.

Also among the respondents, 36 percent, 25 percent and 22 percent were dissatisfied with the government's management of inflation, poverty reduction and population control, respectively.

Metro Manila respondents said that they were satisfied with the government programs on quality education, disaster response, promoting quality and affordable health care, and protecting the welfare of overseas Filipino workers, while only 34 percent were satisfied with its fight against graft and corruption.

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Among Balanced Luzon respondents, 40 percent, 28 percent, 22 percent and 19 percent were dissatisfied with the government's control of inflation, poverty reduction, job creation and food security, respectively.

Of the respondents in the Visayas, 65 percent said they were satisfied with the government's program of creating jobs, while 56 percent of those in Mindanao said they were satisfied with the government's population control program.

Meanwhile, 37 percent and 31 percent of the ABC socioeconomic class were dissatisfied with the government's food security and tax reduction programs.

Twenty-four percent of respondents in Class E were dissatisfied with the government's food security program.

The survey had 1,200 respondents who were chosen randomly, with a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percent.