Sleeping Too Much Linked to a 69% Increased Risk of Dementia

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The researchers suggest that the cognitive function of older adults with prolonged sleep time should be monitored.

A new study analyzes how sleep duration and timing impact dementia risk.

The time individuals go to bed and how much sleep they get may increase their chance of getting dementia, according to a recent study that was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

During an average follow-up of 3.7 years, 97 individuals in a study of 1,982 older adults in China who were dementia-free at the beginning of the study developed dementia.

The risk of dementia was 69% greater in those who slept for more than 8 hours (compared to 7-8 hours) and twice as high in those who went to bed before 9 p.m. (versus 10 PM or later).

“This suggests that cognitive function should be monitored in older adults who report prolonged 102time in bed and advanced sleep timing,” the authors wrote.